IMPACTS OF ROOT COMPETITION IN FORESTS AND WOODLANDS: A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTS

Predicting the types of forest in which root competition affects seedling performance, and the types of plants that respond most strongly to release from root competition. Testing predictions by reviewing experiments in which tree seedlings and forest herbs are released from belowground competition, usually by cutting trenches to sever the roots of surrounding trees. Coomes,Continue reading “IMPACTS OF ROOT COMPETITION IN FORESTS AND WOODLANDS: A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTS”

Factors Preventing the Recovery of New Zealand Forests Following Control of Invasive Deer

We consider the contributions that scientific research can make to effective forest restoration, including empirically based forest-dynamics models that place regeneration in the context of other processes, such as disturbance, soil fertility, and multiple invasive organisms using the example of Red Deer in New Zealand. Coomes, D.A.;  Allen, R.B.; Forsyth, D.M.; Lee, W.G. 2003 PDF

Designing systems to monitor carbon stocks in forests and shrublands

This paper describes a system for monitoring carbon in New Zealand’s forests and shrublands  6.3 and 2.6 million ha, respectively), which was tested on a 60 km-wide transect across the South Island. Coomes, D.A.;  Allen, R.B.; Scott, N.A.; Goulding, C.; Beets, P. 2002 PDF

Disturbances prevent stem size-density distributions in natural forests from following scaling relationships

Enquist and Niklas propose that trees in natural forests have invariant size-density distributions (SDDs) that scale as a -2 power of stem diameter, although early studies described such distributions using negative exponential functions. Using New Zealand and ‘global’ data sets, we demonstrate that neither type of function accurately describes the SDD over the entire diameterContinue reading “Disturbances prevent stem size-density distributions in natural forests from following scaling relationships”

Comment on “A Brief History of Seed Size”

A comment on ‘A Brief History of Seed Size’ by Mole et al. in which an argument is made against understanding the association of greater seed size with greater plant height through use of Charnov’s life-history theory for mammals. Grubb, P.J.; Coomes, D.A.; Metcalfe, D.J. 2005 PDF